Plant: After last frost

Sesamum indicum

150 seeds/pack  |  110 days   |   Heirloom

Graceful plants produce multitudes of tan sesame seeds along tall stalks. The dried seeds taste nutty; they can be dry roasted and used whole in cooking or ground into a paste.  Beautiful white flowers are tubular. Loves heat! To harvest allow the stalks to dry then cut and shake into a bag or bin. We find the stalks dry at various time so it is necessary to do multiple harvests off your patch. Luckily, when the seed pods open they do so upwards so the seed doesn’t fall out. 

$2.75

Plant: After last frost

Amaranthus gangeticus

200 seeds/pack   |   90-100 days   |   Heirloom

This amaranth variety will add a little Dr. Seuss to your garden. The large red seed heads are reminiscent of an elephant trunk and filled with thousands of red seeds. Thanks to Uncle Jeff for passing along this great variety to us!

$2.75

Plant: After last frost

Amaranthus hypocondriacus

200 seeds/pack   |   98-110 days   |   Heirloom

This grain amaranth produces golden seeds with a high protein profile. Known as an ancient grain of the Americas, it is still popular today (known as kiwicha) in Peru.  These plants will easily reach 7-8 feet and need good spacing. This is one of the easiest grains for home gardeners to grow and eat. To harvest, allow seeds to dry partially on plant and then cut seed heads into a paper bag or onto a sheet for further processing. Be watchful at this stage—little birds also love these seeds!

$2.75

Plant: After last frost

Amaranthus cruentus

200 seeds/pack   |  70-100 days   |  Heirloom

With seeds high in amino acids and leaves loaded in iron and calcium, why not grow amaranth?  This burgundy variety was used as a red dye plant by the Hopi people. The leaves can be eaten like spinach while the shiny black seeds can be cooked like rice or ground into gluten free flour.  Growing 7-8 feet tall, amaranth needs good spacing and thrives in our summer heat.

$2.75

Plant: After last frost

Sorghum bicolor

100 seeds/pack   |   110 days   |  Heirloom

Originating in Africa and grown for years on the San Carlos reservation in Arizona, this sorghum cultivar is prized for its exceedingly sweet stalks that can be processed into syrup or simply sucked like sugarcane. Grows 10-12 ft. The seeds have nutritional qualities although ; though, it is prized more often as a forage crop for livestock. The seed heads can be stripped of seeds and bound together to make colorful brooms!

$2.75

Plant: After last frost

Hordeum vulgare subsp. Vulgare

50 seeds/pack   |   89 days   |   Heirloom

Spring planted, this ancient 6-row hulless barley variety has vigorous growth and is easy to clean. Blue/brown seed. Delicious cooked in soups. Grows to about 4 feet in seed.

$2.75

Plant: After last frost

Sesamum indicum

150 seeds/pack   |   110 days   |   Heirloom

In our quest to minimize our grocery bill we've become hooked on sesame. Easy to grow and vigorous, sesame loves the summer heat and grows well in most soils type with average water. This variety produces black seeds! Just as tasty as the tan with a unique look. After growing sesame once, we're sure you'll include it in your garden again and again. The plants can grow to waist high and taller with lovely white tubular flowers. It is really a stunning plant suitable for edible landscapes.

$2.75

Plant: After last frost

Fagopyrum esculentum

100 seeds/pack   |   70-84 days   |   Heirloom

Excellent summer cover crop.  Loosens heavy soils and adds organic matter.  The roots of buckwheat are very fibrous.  It is also an excellent forage crop for pollinators that love the small white flowers.  We use it extensively in our seed gardens to lessen chances of cross pollination.  And of course, the dried seeds can be ground for human consumption.  Buckwheat pancakes anyone?

$2.75

Plant: After last frost

Chenopodium quinoa

150 seeds/pack    |   90-110 days

This colorful quinoa stands 5-6 feet and ranges from mauve to orange to light blues. Quinoa is a native of the Andes Mountain range of South America. The seeds are often cooked and eaten like rice and the leaves of the growing plants are also edible steamed.  Quinoa needs spacing of at least one foot and prefers cooler temps with daytime maximums not exceeding 90 F. We have found however, that this variety did well in our climate where temps can easily exceed 100 F on a summer day. Quinoa seeds are coated with a naturally occurring saponin that is very bitter. To render the seeds edible they must be rinsed thoroughly.

$2.75

Plant: After last frost

Chenopodium quinoa

150 seeds/pack   |   150 days   |   Heirloom

Very tall growth to 10 feet. Slender and branching. Day length-sensitive. This variety will not flower and produce seed until the hours of light wane in the fall. At our latitude in Northern CA this was in late October. This variety would probably do best in a climate that usually has a long growing season and few fall rains. Brilliant yellow seeds! Be sure to rinse well to remove the bitter saponins before eating.

$2.75

Plant: After last frost

Chenopodium quinoa

150 seeds/pack    |    90-110 days

Quinoa will always be a stop on our garden tour. This variety stands true to its name. As the seed heads mature their color intensifies into brilliant golds and bright oranges. This delicious, nutty flavored seed has more protein than any commonly eaten grain. To harvest, cut heads with mature seed onto a sheet, allow to dry, then stomp. Collect seed and winnow in the wind or in front of a fan. Remember to rinse the seed before eating; it is covered with a bitter saponin that must be rinsed to remove. 

$2.75

Plant: After last frost

Chenopodium quinoa

150 seeds/pack   |   90-110 days   |   Heirloom

Heavy producer of small tan seeds. Seed heads not as colorful as some varieties but makes up for this in quantity. Adaptable variety. Not day length-sensitive and will grow in most climates.

$2.75

Plant: After last frost

Sorghum bicolor

100 seeds/pack   |   110 days   |   Heirloom

Excellent variety of sorghum with a high sugar content in the stalks. Homesteaders used to crush the stalks and boil the sweet liquid down to make a sweet sugar syrup. The seed grain is good for grinding or chickens and the stalks can also be used for large animal forage.

$2.75

Plant: After last frost

Sorghum bicolor

100 seeds/pack   |   100-120 days   |   Heirloom

At 10-12 feet, this crop is an impressive visual in any garden. Grown for the seeds. Yes! They pop! This variety originates from our southern neighbors, the Tarahumara people of Mexico. However, popping sorghum is also found ubiquitously in western Africa according to one ‘old’ Peace Corps volunteer we know. 

$2.75

Plant: After last frost

Eragrostis tef

100 seeds/pack   |   90 days   |   Heirloom

Grass producing a very small seed known to be high in fiber, calcium, and protein. Originating in the Eritrean and Ethiopian Highlands and best known as the main ingredient in injera bread.

$2.75

Plant: After last frost

Pennisetum glaucum

200 seeds/pack   |   100 days   |   Heirloom

Like a giant grass, this grain grows 7-10 feet and produces multiple seed heads on each plant. The seed heads resemble a corn cob with no husk and are covered with many small blue grains. This millet is a food staple in western Africa and seems well suited for our climate region. Pearl millet is well adapted to growing areas characterized by drought, low soil fertility, and high temperatures. It performs well in soils with high salinity or low pH. Because of its tolerance to difficult growing conditions, it can be grown in areas where other cereal crops, such as maize or wheat, would not survive.

$2.75

Plant: After last frost

Triticum spp.

50 seeds/pack   |   90 days   |   Heirloom

Fast to mature, this wheat has a beautiful blue cast in the seeds and seed heads. We plant in the spring for an early summer harvest. 200 plants yields approx. half a gallon of seed. Grind for flour or use whole in soups and stews.

$2.75